Welcome Laura Nelson Selinsky, author of Season of Hope!

I’m so happy to have fellow Anaiah author visiting today. Her Christmas novella, Season of Hope, released last week, and you don’t want to miss it!

What sparked your interest in becoming a writer? I’ve been a passionate reader since I was a little girl, I studied and teach literature, and my husband, children and their partners are all academic writers…writing was inevitable for me. That I write fiction is the plot twist.

What is your favorite scene in your new release? My favorite scene in Season of Hope is when *Nick rescues Grace from the icy fire escape, endearing himself to the protagonist Claudia, who is Grace’s half-sister. The idea of that little girl falling thirty feet frightens me when I read it, and I’m the one who imagined it.

*Yes, I wrote a Christmas novel in which I deliberately names a character “Nick.” Feel free to chuckle.

Best Writing Advice You’ve Ever Received– “Write what you know.” Season of Hope is set in a community I know well and love. I could see every inch of the setting from the moment I began writing.

Worst Writing Advice You’ve Ever Received “Write what you know.” The first piece I published was a Lovecraftian horror piece that illustrated a theological concept. Trust me when I say that I didn’t know that world and I hope I never will. So many of the best literary worlds come from imagination. We’d be pretty bored if my heroes Tolkien and C.S. Lewis limited themselves to writing about post-war Oxford.

Do you have a favorite object that is pertinent to your writing? This is not exactly an object, but Marie, a secondary character in Season of Hope, is a fabulous cook. I loved writing her food masterpieces; I even composed recipes for them.

How does your family feel about having a writer in the family? Do they read your books? My family has been emotionally and financially supportive. Most important, my husband has helped me find the time for writing; not easy when I have a more-than-full-time job teaching students with significant learning differences. My children and nieces have beta-read my fantasy novels—Season of Hope is the first long piece that none of them read until it published.

Do you belong to a critique group? If so, how does this help or hinder you? For ten years, I’ve belonged to a wonderful critique group under aegis of Pennwriters. It’s an open group, but there is little turn-over. Visitors are often surprised at how much commitment and time is required to prepare helpful critiques, and that’s in advance of the meetings. The group critiqued early drafts of Season of Hope and of everything else I’ve published. More important, we keep each other going when the rejections hit the double- and triple-digits. Seek out such groups through regional and national writers’ organizations. For example, if you write YA or children’s book, SCBWI can help you find a good critique group. If any writer has the opportunity to participate in a group like mine, joining is worth the effort.


Thank you for visiting and pick up a copy of Season of Hope today!

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